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An Inside Look into the Founding of the State of Israel

Tourists can celebrate the miracle of Israel's founding by visiting sites dedicated to the events surrounding the creation of the Jewish State.

Independence Hall was the site chosen in 1948 to declare Israel's independence. The former residence of Tel Aviv's first mayor now serves as a historical museum that tells the story of Israel's creation.

The Herzl Museum documents the life of the staunch assimilationist-turned- father-of-Zionism while preserving his memory and spreading his message. It is, appropriately, located right on top of Mount Herzl.

Eliezer Ben Yehuda's House gives visitors a tour of the creator of the Modern Hebrew language's house in Jerusalem where he resided in the early 1900s.

The Ayalon Institute Museum features the reconstructed underground factory used by the Haganah in preparation for the War of Independence.

Ben Gurion's Hut on Kibbutz Sde Boker has been preserved completely intact, giving tourists an inside look at how Israel's first Prime Minister lived.

The Ben Gurion House was the permanent home of David Ben Gurion and his wife before moving to Sde Boker. Visitors can learn about the life of David Ben Gurion by observing his home in Tel Aviv, which has also been preserved intact.

The Mikve Israel Agricultural School was founded in 1870 to teach new Jewish settlers proper farming methods. After that, it served as a base for the Haganah and a home for immigrant children.

The Haganah Museum is located at the former home of Eliyahu Golomb, one of its founders, which also served as the organization’s main headquarters. On display at the museum, in addition to the story of the Haganah, are an extraordinary collection of weapons, documents and photographs from the Haganah archives. 

The Palmach Museum  is an experiential museum in which visitors join a group of new Palmach recruits at the beginning of the museum and advance through the ranks and throughout the history of Palmach until the War of Independence. 

The Etzel Museum offers an inside look at the Irgun’s transition from paramilitary militia to its official status as a member of the Israel Defense Forces.